Here We Go! (Sintra, Lisbon, Prague, Budapest, Vienna, London )- EuroTrip 2018/2019

Castle of the Moors, Sintra Portugal

It started simply enough, with the idea of visiting my friend Julia again in Germany and maybe also going to Prague finally, as it’s one of the European cities i’ve always dreamed of visiting but I hadn’t been to yet. Of course, it’s me, and if you read the title of this post you can see it didn’t turn out quite like that.

After coming back from our 5 day trip to Seattle/Vancouver last July a flight alert came through for a pretty cheap flight to London and after a quick discussion with the bf, we snapped up some tickets. Now, I get a few more vacation days a year than he does so we decided, hey how about I go ahead without him for a week or so and then we meet up in Prague? I’d traveled by myself in Europe before and while it hadn’t been exactly smooth sailing, I’d rather travel than not travel so, why not.

(Btw, just a heads up but this isn’t the whole post for this trip, if you’re not a regular follower of this blog then you may not be familiar with my other “Here We Go” posts so lemme link them here for you:

Here We Go- EuroTrip 2017
Here We Go- EuroTrip 2018 )

The Initiation inverted tower at Quinta da Regaleira, Sintra Portugal

Queluz National Palace, Queluz Portugal

Interior of the Palace of Mafra, Mafra Portugal

Inside part of the National Azulejo Museum, Lisbon Portugal

I’d seen a number of blogposts and instagram photos of the beautiful palaces and castles of Sintra and this combined with how affordable Lisbon seemed inspired me to choose it as my first destination. I left on Thanksgiving and though that was slightly depressing, being up in the air traveling by myself on a day usually spent with loved ones, it did give me two extra days I didn’t have to use PTO and considering my stomach gets severely messed up on long flights, i’d rather not be regurgitating turkey for the next few days all over Portugal.

Though i’ll write about it more in depth later on, I do want to say that in Sintra I met so many amazingly kind and interesting people who made my stay there seem all the more magical. And once my 3 days there were up, I moved to a central hotel in Lisbon for the rest of the stay and was just incredibly enchanted by how amazing this city is and just how much history is saturated in every city block, how every viewpoint is just breathtaking. If I had to pick a country that I just know I have to come back to, while Italy used to be the #1 spot, I think Portugal has taken it now (which is so unfortunate because I’ve spent the last year and 1/2 studying Italian and known exactly 3 words in Portuguese)

Praça do Comércio, Lisbon Portugal

View over the Alfama Neighborhood in Lisbon Portugal

Old town in Prague Czech Republic

Eating a trdelník in Prague Czech Republic

After the many, many (many) adventures I had in Portugal, I ended up missing my flight to Munich where I was meant to meet up with my aforementioned friend Julia because sometimes I have the best luck in the world and sometimes life just kicks you in the teeth a little bit. But, I did eventually make it to Prague though, and while the adventure I had in the airport there is something else to write about, at least in the end I met up with the bf, both of us very ecstatically happy to see each other after 10 days apart and ready to begin our travels together from Prague to Budapest to Vienna and finally London.

St Vitus Cathedral, Prague Czech Republic

View over Prague from the Prague Castle

How to survive the long train ride from Prague to Budapest

Interior of the Szechenyi bathhouse in Budapest, Hungary

Inside a ruin pub in Budapest, Hungary

Bazylika św. Stefana and a Christmas market in Budapest, Hungary

Exterior of Hofburg Palace in Vienna, Austria

The mumok museum in the Museumsquartier Vienna, Austria

St. Stephen’s Cathedral, Vienna

Buckingham Palace London, England

Super touristy but super worth it view from the London Eye

Arriving back in the US, at Newark

Allll the souvenirs

I have very literally over a thousand photos, both that I took with my camera and on my iPhone (these here are all from my phone cause i’m a lazy little blogger sometimes, don’t judge) so it’s…probably going to take me a bit to go through everything and put together comprehensive posts but, i’ll be getting on that here in the next week or so.

Till then- not drowning in my coffee cups yet,
~m

Transcendence, Sore Feet and Grandeur at St. Peter’s Basilica – Vatican City, Italy

Following my last post on the Vatican Musuems, take this one as a continuation in both spirit and layout form.

What does it feel like to be illuminated from the inside out, to feel like your mouth will never fully close from all the grandeur around you and to not even care that your feet are screaming bloody murder with each and every step. Take a visit to St Peters Basilica after spending the previous day walking all over Florence and you’re almost guaranteed to feel the same way.

After finishing up in the museum, our small tour group wound it’s way towards what would be the grand finale, St. Peters Basilica.

Fun fact, while this canopy over the alter may look massive, let me assure it it’s even larger than you would think. Bernini’s baldacchino is 96 feet tall and contains about 100,000 pounds of bronze… thats right, bronze. A reason it might not look as large as it really is would be because the dome above it is a staggering 452 feet.

There is never a moment when you are not just standing here in awe, utterly dwarfed by it all.

To say this was a magnificent end to a morning full of wonder would be an understatement. It’s hard to fully state just how beautiful, awe-inspiring and humbling it is to visit a place like the Vatican and know you’ve only seen maybe 10% of all that is to see. I have a friend who’s been here four times already and is still ready to go back at a moments chance and if I lived any distance shorter, I would be the same. As it is, I don’t know when i’ll be back but I know with a fervent assurance I could spend a solid week here, day in at day break and day out at sunset and still feel there was much to see and learn.

~m

The Incomparable Palazzo Pitti- Florence, Italy

One of the Florence’s largest architectural monuments, the Palazzo Pitti seems doomed to be forever eclipsed by the Uffizi Gallery and the Palazzo Vecchio, even while very much holding its own in regards to beautiful art and history. The fact that tourists seem to forget about this palace (or maybe it’s the slightly drab exterior that does it) worked out perfectly for me and the bf however, and we bought tickets and were inside in a matter of minutes.

There is just so much to see here, the galleries divided like so: Museum of Costume and Fashion, the Royal Apartments, Palatine Gallery, Gallery of Modern Art, and the Treasury of the Grand Dukes.

We had planned to see the vast Boboli Gardens afterwards and then cross back over the Arno to the other side of Florence to visit the Uffizi Gallery, so we only toured the Palatine Gallery and Royal Apartments, but I would genuinely love to go back and see everything one day.

The crowds were minimal apart from some small tour groups and there were plenty of moments where we had whole rooms to ourselves, the decadence of that experience almost too great at times- imagine yourself surrounded on all sides by lush gorgeous paintings, evocative sculptures, tall incredibly ornate ceilings and the realization you’re standing in a building that’s been around since the 15th century.

From a window on the first floor, a view of Florence over the Grotto steps you even further back in time.

Amid the rooms full of rosy peach tones and gold accents, the room spilled with deep, vibrant emerald was one of my favorites.

I don’t know how long exactly we stayed inside, maybe two hours? It felt both a good while and like no time had passed when we made it back downstairs and into the fresh crisp air and streaming sunlight. After a quick stop to retrieve the bf’s backpack from the cloakroom and stow away the books and souvenirs I had purchased (of course), we got out the separate tickets we had purchased to enter the Boboli Gardens (just an extra 6 €) and headed that way with much eagerness, because the way I saw it, if the interior had been so splendid, I couldn’t wait to see what kind of beauty the gardens would hold.

~m

The Walk to the Palazzo Pitti- Florence, Italy

After leaving the Florence Cathedral and having re-energized ourselves with coffee and pastries, we headed on our way to the Uffizi Gallery. Afterwards the plan was to cross the Arno river via the Ponte Vecchio and finish up the day at the Palazzo Pitti.  We were a little worried the weather would turn ugly as we had a couple of stop planned along the way and while we had already endured 3 days straight of rain in Venice with no problem, we didn’t want to do it again in Florence.

Thankfully by the time we reached The Basilica di Santa Croce, the skies had cleared up again to picturesque cloudy fluffs with brilliant blue beneath.

Completed in the 14th Century, Santa Croce is the principle Franciscan church in Florence and is also the largest Franciscan church in the world. While we had been planning the way we would walk to the Uffizi Gallery, we had seen this church as kinda on the way and figured, why not stop by? We didn’t go inside but even just getting a chance to see the beautiful exterior was worth the detour. We sat down on one of the many benches around the square and eventually, only a bit reluctantly, made our way to the next stop on our walking tour, the Palazzo Vecchio.

The town hall of Florence, the Palazzo Vecchio is an immensely interesting building thats bursting with history but this was another place we decided to save for a later visit. One of the reasons for this is we’d seen a couple of interesting historical  residence/art museum type buildings already in Venice and we were sure the Palazzo Pitti would have enough to hold our interest in this regard (spoiler alert: it 100% delivered on that). From what i’ve read, the best way to visit the Palazzo Vecchio is to take a tour as there are many rooms and halls that are only accessible via guided tour so, definetly something we put on the list for a longer return trip.

The exterior is incredible in it’s own right and just next to it is the Loggia dei Lanzi (also known as the Loggia della Signoria as it’s on the corner of the Piazza della Signoria where the Palazzo Vechio is situated)  which is an amazing open-air sculpture gallery. Even if you don’t have the time or inclination to visit the Palazzo Vecchio, I can’t recommend enough to at least pass by the area, especially if you’re headed to the Uffizi Gallery as it’s a straight shot from there.

After leaving the dramatically beautiful statues behind, we made it to the Uffizi Gallery and were confronted by a rather huge line. We had expected this one however and had previously discussed that if the line here was incredibly long, we would head to the Pitti Palace first instead and finish up the day at the Uffizi Gallery when we came back. This was mainly because I was more keen to seen the Boboli Gardens of the Palazzo Pitti than any art held inside the gallery and so, we kept walking on towards the Arno river and crossed the Ponte Vecchio to the other side of Florence.

Taking our time, we made it to the Pitti Palace by around 1pm that afternoon and found no line to get inside- fates way of telling us we had made the right choice by coming here first maybe? Either way we happily headed inside to explore the opulent interiors.

~m

The Bridge of Sighs and a Beautiful Goodbye – Venice, Italy

I feel like I write the phrase “it was like something out of a dream” so often on this blog that people must think i’m always half awake when I travel, but the truth is that though I would consider myself a writer of at least some skill- there’s always places that I visit that truly do leave me without the necessary adjectives to describe them in any way that does them justice.

We woke up early that last day to wander our way down the quiet and still sleeping streets to make it to Piazza San Marco and get a chance to see it one more time before we left. Not only did we get spared from the constant drizzle of the days before, but there were absolutely no crowds yet and apart from a couple of other dedicated photographers walking around trying to get their best shots, the area was fairly deserted compared to the last time we had been there.

(credit to the bf for taking the photo of me standing in front of Basilica San Marco, I would almost say he’s looking to challenge me for title of head photographer on our trips  )

The previous two days that we’d made our way to see the Bridge of Sighs, it’d been fairly impossible to try and get a good shot because of the crowds but that morning, we had the bridge that overlooks the canal it’s suspended over all to ourselves. After I had finished looking at the beautiful coastline and the islands on the other side (and wishing we had maybe a little bit more time to make it over to explore them), we walked up to the bridge and there was just one guy there, trying to take a good selfie of himself in front of it. He saw us and asked very nicely if we would take a photo of him and I enthusiastically obliged and snapped two photos from him, after which he thanked us with a big smile and walked off to admire the canal coastline himself and suddenly we had the view of the Bridge of Sighs all to ourselves.

A really rather popular tourist attraction in Venice, the Bridge of Sighs is a beautiful enclosed arch bridge built in the 17th century as a way to connect the New Prison to the interrogation rooms in the Doges Palace. The general consensus seems to be the name of the bridge comes from the idea that convicts crossing the bridge to the prisons would get one last glimpse of the lagoon through the covered windows and heave a despairing sigh but…. historically there doesn’t seem to be much credence to this. Personally I can attest that the view is limited from inside the bridge as the glass panels are very cloudy and also crossed with steel bars on the inside, but I can also say that if I was crossing any bridge as a prisoner, I would probably let out a good number of sighs no matter what.

The walk back to our hotel was unhurried as we had already packed up the night before and had our transportation to the Venezia Santa Lucia train station arranged by the staff, so we had plenty of time to marvel at all the unique and beautifully colored buildings that surrounded us.

Once back at the hotel we tucked into breakfast and then time seemed to rush on by until suddenly our water taxi was there and it was time to check out and begin the journey to Rome.

A thrilling and beautiful ride on a lovely water taxi, bright morning light streaming in through the windows as the city rushed by us made a pretty perfect way to say goodbye to Venice.

~m