The Forum Romanum and a Goodbye- Rome, Italy

Was this the highlight of our stay in Rome? Long answer no (St Peters Basilica was surreal but my hurt hurt like the dickens to the point it was excruciating to stand and marvel at it all), short answer heck yes. I honestly can’t emphasize how necessary a visit is to the Roman Forum if you are visiting Rome and considering we almost didn’t go ourselves thats saying something.

I think the only real downside to the visit was that because we chose to do this in conjunction with the Colosseum tour (which isn’t necessary but the ticket price for us just made sense), we didn’t have as much time to explore as I would have liked once the tour concluded. But to be fair, I feel like I would need a full day to see it all and I’m more than willing to come back to do so.

Being for centuries the center of everyday life in Rome, the sprawling ruins of the forum are capable of capturing anyone’s imagination and I would almost dare anyone to visit and not be filled with wonder and immense curiosity at the lives of the people who inhabited these spaces.

( For information on how to get there, it’s location- next to the Colosseum it’s pretty obvious but still-, the price of admission and opening hours I would suggest going here. )

After paying my respects at Julius Caesar’s alter (not to be confused with his grave, but where his remains were cremated and where his altar is dedicated ) we headed back down the street to our Airbnb apartment where it was time to pack things up for the next mornings journey to Paris.

After snacking on what will always remain the best tasting strawberries that I’d picked up earlier on our walk back from the Pantheon, I alternated between packing and making sure we were reading for our early departure and marveling at the incredible view from our windows as the sun set and night descended complete with twinkling stars.

I can say with a surety that i’m sure has been expressed millenniums before- there is no city quite like Rome and I would almost say that any first time visit to Italy isn’t complete without at least a stop to the city that all roads lead to.

~m

Wonder and Incredible Views in the Boboli Gardens- Florence, Italy

Though the Palazzo Pitti is a great place to visit all its own, the reason I picked it over the Uffizi Gallery was because of its gardens. The Boboli Gardens to be exact, located just behind the palace, were established in the 16th century by the Medici family, though there have certainly been many updates and renovations since then.

We were incredibly lucky and managed to visit on a day with crisp cool weather, beautiful blue skies and a minimum of crowds and spent more than a couple of hours walking around, not only because of how immense the area is but because of how incredibly relaxing it was just to explore all the areas, it felt like you never knew what could be around the corner- perhaps a marvelous fountain, an impossibly stoic statue?

Up a staircase, to where and what? Why not go and find out?

Incredible views of the countryside and more of the gardens! The best part of visiting the Boboli gardens was feeling a little bit like a kid and getting the chance to pick any direction and just go off to explore and discover.

And of course, no matter how lovely the gardens, it was the statues and the amazing views of Florence that just really made it all that much more spectacular.

We finished up the trip by wandering up a little hill and discovering yet more incredible views. It honestly felt like there was no where you could go in the gardens where you weren’t rewarded for your curiosity.

We stayed in the gardens until about 5:00pm, and then exited to sit and linger in the front of the palace where many other people had just plopped down to rest and hangout before figuring out their plans for the rest of the afternoon. Our own plans at that point where to make the return walk to the train station where we would catch the ride that would take us back to Rome, but for the time before that walk was started, was just sat there outside the Palazzo Pitti and enjoyed the lingering remains of the day, people watching and feeling ever so reluctant to leave this beautiful city.

~m

Here We Go…- EuroTrip 2018

Dallas –> Paris –> Venice –> Rome –> Florence –> Paris –> Dallas

That was the itinerary for this last trip I just went on and though I’ve been back home for about two weeks now, considering just last week I finally finished posting about the last trip… you can imagine I’m probably not quite as on top of things as I would want.

But the honest truth is I’m actually really very excited to share photos and stories from this last adventure on here and I’m planning on going back to a 3 posts per week kind of schedule to accomplish that without take half a year to get through it all.

It’s gonna be a lot, I came back with over 1000 photos to go through, not to mention the countless stories, adventures and odd moments of travel to put together into some kind of coherent format but hopefully, with some patience, you guys will still be willing to come with me on this ride.

~ m

A Goodbye to Versailles and Hello To A Magical Night Out- Paris, France

 

By the time I had wandered my way to the Grand Trianon on the grounds of Versailles after leaving the the Queens Hamlet, my feet were getting achy and the rain had started to sprinkle down a bit more forcefully. Instead of going inside however (because that would be too logical), I sat just inside the steps, the beautiful black and white tiled floor providing a super elegant resting place to get my energy back up to start the trek back to the main palace and eventually to the meeting place for the tour company I had arrived with that morning.

A lengthy and leisurely visit to the gift shop (but of course) and then it was goodbye to Versailles and back to being a peasant outside it’s gates while I waited with my gathered tour group for the bus to arrive to take us back to Paris.

While on the ride back I got in touch with my friend Rachid who was finishing up teaching a class (because he’s a very smart cookie that teaches mathematics and the story of how we managed to become friends is best left for another day but involves me discovering that some math majors are actually quite cool) and we attempted to coordinate when and where we would meet up, things made a little more difficult because of the weather and unpredictable traffic. Eventually though, I made it back to Paris and the drop off point with the tour group and shortly thereafter met up with Rachid. Being a current Parisian resident, he immediately shuffled us off to the nearest Métro station so we could journey back to my hotel so I could pick up the gift I had gotten for him in Amsterdam and drop off that days souvenirs. He was exceedingly keen on having me experience this form of public transportation, as it’s what he uses on a daily basis and well, why not right? It was a quick trip and soon we were back on our way to our first destination, the french-gothic cathedral Notre-Dame de Paris.

The cathedral was as beautiful as I had expected it to be, almost larger than life in a wonderful way. We didn’t go inside as the area was deeply congested with visitors but just getting to see it up close and personal this way was a great experience to mark off as done on my list of “things to do/see in Paris“. Even as we crossed back over the Seine to head towards what turned out to be the famous Shakespeare and Company bookstore, I was already making plans in my head to come back for a more in-depth visit.

Before visiting Paris, I had only heard of the bookstore via movies and blurbs in travel guides- I think I might have mentioned this before but, I’ve never viewed Paris as that interesting to me personally. Not because its not bursting at the seams with museums and fascinating history- it surely is- but just because there have always been other places that interests me much more. That being said though, the history of the Shakespeare and Company Paris bookstore is a fantastic one and I definetly suggest stopping in. It’s situated just across from Notre-Dame and its a really unexpected book oasis that invites you to linger for a good long while.

Once we had managed to extricate ourselves from here (because I of course wanted to buy dozens of books and maybe a couple of postcards) we began the hunt for a place to grab dinner at nearby. After a bit of talking we settled on the idea that we should try and find a traditional French restaurant as I had never really experienced French cuisine before. Eventually after some walking around the area, we stopped to read a menu displayed outside a restaurant and the waiter (or host, I couldn’t quite tell) managed to get us-er I mean, to invite us to come inside.

So… i’m not going to give the name of the place we ate it- mostly because I honestly can’t with 100% accuracy remember it and so therefore i’d hate to drag the wrong place. But gods, I don’t think i’ve ever had a worse meal. Perhaps it might have been because I couldn’t read the menu (as Rachid speaks fluent French and when our waiter asked “anglaise or french” he said French, leaving me a bit in the dark as an unintended result) and I felt mighty uncomfortable asking him to translate every item and so ended up just going with what seemed familiar to me. It might have been the odd neon lighting, the crinkly plastic tablecloth that stuck to my skin the second I dared to let my arm rest on the table, maybe the really narrow table and hard wooden chairs…or maybe the rather unexpectedly terrible food.

The good thing though, is the meal wasn’t an utter wash because Rachid tucked in and greatly enjoyed his food, the vegetable soup I got on a haphazard whim ended up being almost tasty enough to make up for everything else and the really great conversation we had over the hour we were there made everything else fade into the background. Ahhh the powers of friendship, no?

 

And so, with that neon adventure behind us, we walked onward with no real destination in mind and the sky darkened to true nightfall. We walked over what felt like half a dozen bridges, talking about literature, history, our relationships and respective ideas of love (after all, the subject is almost infused into the bones of this city) and eventually found ourselves outside the Louvre. I remember seeing people walking past the gates and towards the illuminated pyramids and turning to Rachid to ask, “Wait, people can go in there at night?” . He hadn’t known you could explore the courtyard area after the Louvre closed for the day either, and so we crossed the street to follow the rest of people wandering in.

To say it was magical would be such a severe understatement. The next day I came back in the bright daylight hours but the way everything look that night- softly lit and only sparsely populated with visitors- thats the way I think I want to remember it forever.

I really can’t overemphasize visiting the Louvre at night- you can’t go inside the museum itself because it’s closed but that shouldn’t stop you from visiting the area to view it at night, to get a chance to look around such a historic place with plenty of breathing room thats very hard to find during the daylight hours. Also, it’s just really freaking cool.

We ended the visit by crossing the street to get a closer look at the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel (not to be confused with the larger and more famous Arc de Triomphe de l’Étoile ) and idly wondering how far it would be to walk from here to either the Eiffel Tower or the other Arc. Probably overambitious on my part but I was considering walking from either one back to the Louvre the next day, though Rachid was more rational in that taking the Métro would be the better plan (he’s such a smart guy but definetly still needs to learn just exactly how utterly irrational I can be, ha).

Eventually though, as the time got later and later, we decided it would be a good idea to call it a night as he had a class to teach in the morning and I was more than a little tired from the long day. Ever the gracious host to his city and an amazing friend, Rachid walked me back to my hotel before finding his own way back home. Have I mentioned what a great person he is? Yes? Once more then!

Considering I started and spent half the day exploring Versailles and then the other half seeing so many wonderful Parisian sights and treasures, it truly was a day and night to remember and it ended up really cementing in me the deep desire to come back again, and soon.

~m

Wooden Masks, Colorful Frescoes, and Rain Soaked Violins- Mittenwald, Germany

I woke up that morning to the sound of soft rain and my phone buzzing with unanswered texts and WhatsApp messages. It was my last full day in Germany and I almost didn’t want to get out of bed , just to prolong the time I had left. But Julia would be arriving soon to pick me up so we could make our way to the days adventure so lounging around in bed really wasn’t an option. Besides, when had time ever stopped for someone?

An hour later I was downstairs, checking out and receiving my complimentary chocolate and then shortly thereafter I was running through the rain to get to Julia’s van. We drove around Garmisch looking for somewhere to stop in at for breakfast (and coffee for me) all the whole wondering if the rain would ever let up. (Spoiler alert: it didn’t)

Breakfast was procured at an amazing little cafe and I had what felt like my 100th cappuccino of the trip (more about that in my last post) and then once more, we set off into the rain.

Our first stop of the day was the Werdenfels Museum, in the Partenkirchen section of Garmisch-Partenkirchen. The history of this town is pretty interesting, especially considering that for most of their respective histories, they were separate towns, with Garmisch in the west and Partenkirchen in the east. They were forced to join together in anticipation of the 1936 Winter Olympic Games by Adolf Hitler and while they still remain recognized as one town, each side retains its own unique identity and atmosphere. Julia and I mainly spent our time in the Garmisch part but that morning we ventured over to the other side.

Definetly the smallest of museum i’ve ever been in, but also one of the most interesting. Julia and I spent about two hours here, walking around the small rooms and up creaking wooden stairs, taking in all the items on display . One section we stayed in front of for a while was this room that held a case displaying wooden face masks. These, she explained to me, were face masks people wore for the Fasching festival, which I later learned was a bit like Carnaval, basically a pre-lent celebration.

I thought about those masks a lot after we left, the history behind them, and frankly also just the way they managed to be wonderfully artistic while also being slightly terrifying. It didn’t help that Julia noticed and said, once we had left and were in the dimly lit underground parking garage, “It would be really scary if you were in your car and looked out and a person in one of those mask was just outside, but also kind of funny too- how would you describe them to the police.” In either case, the museum was very interesting and there were so many great items and pieces of art and history to look over that even if I might have had some small nightmares about those masks later, I didn’t regret the visit.

After a morning spent indoors we were ready to breathe in some fresh air, even if the rain still hadn’t let up. Julia suggested a quick trip over to the town of Mittenwald and off we went, curling our way in her van towards what ended up being another dreamy fairly-tale like town.

A town famous for its painted houses and violin making history, it’s also well known for its colorful church of Saints Peter and Paul. We of course had to pay it a visit.

A beautiful interior matches the almost exuberant exterior and even the rainy day couldn’t diminish the way it stands out even amid all the other brightly colored buildings. Very few people were inside that day and so we got to gaze up at the frescoes in relative peace and quiet, sheltered from the rain outside. It was the last church we visited on my trip there, and while I can’t say it was my favorite (given the almost literal dozen I visited) it definitely holds a special place and if you’re in Mittenwald or even in the general area, I highly suggest you make the visit.

We walked around a bit more after that, the streets quiet and mostly empty apart from some other intrepid sightseers. The air smelled just like it had when we were in Ramsau, clean and crisp but with the scent of woodsy burning firewood drifting over us. Eventually though, even the comforting smell and brightly colored buildings weren’t enough to distract us from the way our feet were getting rather cold and how time was rapidly moving towards afternoon.

And so, rain still falling, we headed back to Garmisch-Partenkirchen and then later, back to Geretsried so I could repack and get ready to finally head off to the trips last destination, Paris.

~m