A Walk Through History in The Colosseum – Rome, Italy

After making it back from our morning sightseeing walk and depositing the souvenirs we (I) had obtained as well as the fresh fruit I had picked up from a market stall along the way, we headed back out just down the street to meet up with the tour group that would be taking us through the Colosseum.

These two photos here- of me and this flag i’m holding-  are rather important, if only because one should inform the other. Through out the whole portion of the trip we spent in Italy, more often then not, I kept being mistaken for being Italian (though I got a couple of “français ?” as well) . And this wouldn’t have been a big deal if I was fluent in Italian but i’m not- even at this point in time as I write this, i’m only painfully awkward at a conversational level. I can understand the language well enough but definetly not enough to speak it when i’m mistaken as Italian by a local and they begin speaking to me rapidly in said language (the look of disappointment in their eyes as I began haltingly answering back in Italian and then was forced to switch to English is a giant motivator in the last few months of study i’ve put into learning the language btw).

So anyways, story time. Me and the bf signed up to take a tour of the Colosseum + the Roman Forum and once we met up with the group at the appointed time and location, we headed on towards the entrance, where the tour guide got tickets on our behalf and once we made it up to the point where security passes you through a turnstile, he would use each ticket to have us go through. When it was my turn, I passed through without incident but when the bf tried to go through, the turnstile wouldn’t turn- apparently there was an error with the tickets.

The thing is, we had signed up for this tour specifically because it was the only way to tour the underground levels of the Colosseum, as you had to do it accompanied in a tour group but also with a licensed archeologist guide that would meet the group inside the Colosseum. This archeologist was already waiting for us at the designated meeting point and as our tour guide was being held up by trying to figure out what was wrong with the tickets, he turned to our small group and said, “Ok, I need one of you to take this flag while I go fix this.” And then, somehow, I ended up being the person who got to lead out tour group down to the meeting point. Which would have been fine, if a bit of a novel experience, if the archeologist waiting for us hadn’t immediately pounced on my when she saw I was holding the flag to begin rapidly talking in Italian and gesturing to our group with questions.

The rest of the tour group jumped in rapidly to correct her and let her know where our real guide was and her response after realizing the situation and mix up was a long and hearty laugh, many apologies and the words “Mi dispiace! You just have that face- doesn’t she just have that face?” and thats the story of how I got to lead a tour group in the Colosseum for all of 10 minuets and was mistaken as a tour guide while sporting a rather old and overly large hoodie I borrowed from the bf (professional attire at it’s finest i’m sure).

I’d like to say the rest of the tour in the Colosseum went without incident but someone actually ended up puking while we were in the underground levels. Thankfully, they were ok, and it was near the end of that part of the tour and even with all this little things I would still highly recommend signing on to take the tour that enables you to visit the underground levels- most especially because you will be guided by an actual archeologist who has been working there in the Colosseum . I’ve never had a tour guide who was as passionate as she was- not only with telling us the history of the Colosseum (also known as the Flavian Amphitheatre) but with impressing into us the importance of acknowledging the incredible amount of human suffering that went on there, especially while we toured the underground levels.

This is where people worked, lived, fought and died, I remember her telling us. I had already known the majority of combatants who fought in the arena were generally slaves, condemned criminals or prisoners of war but there was something about standing there underneath the arena itself as she showed us where the fighters would have prepared, as we were led us across narrow dark hallways where light barely shown through, as we were shown the pulleys and levers that would transport animals up or bodies back down-  there is a difference to reading about history and standing face to face with it.

That white part you see there in this photo above, that is the only part of the arena floor that remains and once again, you can only step out onto it with the guided archeological tour- and let me tell you, that alone is worth the price of admission. Standing there on the elevated platform and looking out over the arena stands is almost enough to transport you, if only for a moment, to AD 80 when the amphitheater was completed.

By the by, it’s worth nothing how impressive it is that given when it was first built, it still remains the worlds largest amphitheatre.

The rest of the tour was impressive, but as soon as we caught a glimpse of the Roman Forum from one of the upper levels and were told that was where the next part of our tour would be, I could barely hold in my excitement. If you know anything about me and traveling, you know almost nothing interests me as much as ruins and here was this impressive sprawl of ancient roman ruins just waiting to be explored.  We said goodbye to the Colosseum and headed on to the next part of our tour.

We walked slowly from the outer edges of the forum, the views of the Colosseum all that more beautiful to me for having been inside, and deeper into the heart of the Roman Forum.

~m

2 comments

  1. Sartenada · July 16

    Great post from this corner of our World. Happy and safe travels!

    • FablesandCoffee · July 16

      Thank you!

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